Boston mobile startup weekend (Nov 12-14)

Startup weekendLast weekend, Doerte and I attended our first Startup Weekend in Boston. For those who are unfamiliar with Startup Weekend, it is a franchise-based event that takes place in various cities around the world to promote entrepreneurship across the globe. The event takes connects entrepreneurs with like-minded people germinate an idea over a weekend – so even if you have a day job you can still fully participate in this event.

I hope that this blog provides some insights and what to expect at Startup Weekend with my recount of the last Boston Mobile Startup Weekend, which took place from November 12th through 14th. Before we even talk about what happens at Startup Weekend, we have to ask ourselves why bother going to one? Here are some of my reasons:

  1. You got an idea, stop being a wannapreneur. Maybe you are still in a funk or are too afraid. Well, stop procrastinating, and  do something about it. Attend a Startup Weekend.
  2. Network and meet potential co-founders. You may be a non-techie with a tech idea or a developer who needs a business person. Guess what? You need to connect with people and get them join you in your venture. Sitting at home isn’t going to do it. Go spend a weekend with other passionate people and think about how you can change the world. And what better way to find and work with a potential co-founder under pressure during Startup Weekend.
  3. Build a product. What good is an idea if you can’t bring it to fruition? Build a prototype of what you or your team envisions.
  4. Form a business around it. You are not only launch a product but a business. Why should MBA students have all the fun. Analyze and figure out your target market, customer demand, industrial trends, competition, and go-to-market strategies. Many teams continue with their projects and even turn them to viable business after Startup Weekend ends.
  5. Awesome learning experience. The event provides you with opportunity of doing something new. You get to learn form your team mates about a new skill or idea. Execution is hard – making difficult decisions, working under constraints, and doing tradeoffs; but you learn by doing.
  6. Have fun. Need I say more.

Boston Mobile Startup Weekend Friday Night

Boston Mobile Startup Weekend Friday Night

Now that you know the why’s. How do you sign up for one? First, you need to stay tuned for future Startup Weekends in your area. To do that follow @startupweekend on Twitter, look out for announcements on the official Startup Weekend website, or start plugging into your local startup community and stay abreast of what’s happening in your area – perhaps the best place to start is to subscribe to the local edition of Startup Digest. Anyone (techie or non-techie) can register for an upcoming event in the local area. Even if an event is over subscribed, don’t get discouraged. Talk to the organizers, they can get you in especially if you are a developer or designer.

Doerte pitching at Boston Mobile Startup Weekend

Doerte pitching at Boston Mobile Startup Weekend

Startup Weekend kicks off on Friday evening with a series of keynote speeches by established local entrepreneurs to prep the participants up for the event. These speeches are terse so that activities on the first night can move along quickly. Immediately after the keynote speech, you can either pitch an idea of yours and form a team or join a team to pursue the idea.

Sometimes there may even be a workshop scheduled just before Startup Weekend officially begins. In our case, we had a developer’s workshop on developing for Android, iPhone, and Windows Phone 7 in the afternoon before the official start to assist developers get up to speed with the skills and technology in the mobile space. Don’t expect to pick up new skills in one afternoon with this pre-event workshop, it is just a crash course to get yourself set up for contributing at Startup Weekend.

Our team, tired but focused

Our team, tired but focused

On day 2 (Saturday), you go back to the hosting venue, meet and work with the new team to develop the idea as far as the team can go; often to the mock-up stage, some to working prototype stage, and a few even to production stage (one team published a WP7 app by Sunday night, this is rare but possible). The first few hours involves a lot of brainstorming in defining the scope of the product and the business model. By early-afternoon, most team would have determined the market viability of the product and devised go-to-market strategies as well as coming up with basic design of the prototype. My advice for people new to Startup Weekend is to think big and come up with a compelling but realistic business model. For product development, start small by developing a simple but functioning prototype, which by the way score your team points in the product development category, for Sunday night presentation.

Michael and I demoed our prototype at Boston Mobile Startup Weekend

Michael and I demoed our prototype at Boston Mobile Startup Weekend

On the third day (Sunday), you get the whole morning and afternoon to refine your product and slide deck before presenting your team (now a startup) in front of panel of judges, participants, and even press and investors. It’s really gratifying to see how much teams can accomplish in setting a foundation of a startup in a weekend. As for our team, we didn’t take home the bacon but it was fun and we are planning to pursue the idea. Also congratulations to Hitchery who won for their social game based on virtual hitchhiking.

If you still have questions about Startup Weekend? Check out the official FAQ from Startup Weekend, a great read for a first-timer to the event. The most important thing is to stay motivated, be a team player, and have fun during Startup Weekend. Needless to say, I had a blast last weekend.

Remember that Startup Weekend is just a start. The team, business model, and product you built at Startup Weekend can turn into something real and big. Do continue the project and relationships outside of Startup Weekend.

Credits: Hacker Chick for some of the pictures taken at Boston Mobile Startup Weekend

Reading materials for building a digital media startup


I often look to the Internet for inspiration and information for starting a company. Now that I am starting a software/web company, I find the online resource indispensable and relevant to my endeavor. So I have compiled a list of relevant online articles and blog posts that I read and have provided some value to me in starting and building a digital media startup. Here’s the list:

Entrepreneurship Wisdom and Advice

Ideas

Strategy and Framework

Competition

Product Design

  • Minimum Viable Product (MVP) – Nivi, Venture Hacks (Recommended)
    Intro to minimum viable product, a strategy for a rapid development and release of a product or feature to help validate product and market assumptions. A follow-up to this post includes real world examples of MVP.
  • Minimum Desirable Product (MDP) – Andrew Chen (Recommended)
    One criticism of Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is that the framework helps answers questions about a startup from a business perspective. A variant of MVP, calls Minimum Desirable Product (MDP) looks at the startup from a usability and user perspective. Great read if you are committed to creating an insanely great product experience. Here’s a follow-up to the post (with slides included).
  • Design Tips for Startups – Thomas Petersen
    Great design tips for web startups.

Product Development and Management

Business Model

Sales and Marketing

Leadership, People, and Culture

Funding and Pitching

I also want to give a shout-out to Stanley Tang. While compiling this list, I constantly referred to his blog post: 256 Must-Read Content for All Tech Entrepreneurs. It’s a great resource.